Seminars

Other UCLA departments frequently hold seminars related to Statistics and of likely of interest to our members. Here are links to UCLA Biostatistics seminars and UCLA Biomath seminars:
https://www.biostat.ucla.edu/2019-seminars
http://www.biomath.ucla.edu/seminars/

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Tuesday, 11/26/2019, Time: 11:00am
Methodological Advances in Non-parametric Spatio-temporal Point Process Models

Public Affairs Building 1234

Junhyung Park, Graduate Student
UCLA Department of Statistics

With point process data, we are interested in modeling and predicting the occurrence of events, especially those that are clustered and self-exciting. New methodological challenges are posed by the rapid growth in the potential areas of application for statistical point process models. We present recent work on applying point processes to model disease outbreaks and retaliations in violent gang crimes. Some applied methodological novelties for each area are discussed.

Junhyung Park is a fifth year graduate student working under Rick Schoenberg. He has been working on developing applied methodology for point process models. Prior to coming to Los Angeles, he studied economics and mathematics at the University of Virginia and worked as a research associate at the International Monetary Fund. Prior to joining the Statistics Department, Junhyung earned master’s degrees in economics and biostatistics at UCLA.